06 agosto 2016


In un tweet divenuto subito popolare Jonathan Coe si chiede se 36 sterline - o 40 dollari - non siano in fondo soldi ben spesi per meglio comprendere se stesso: http://www.sc.edu/uscpress/books/2016/7650.html

Merritt Moseley examines Coe's complex engagement with popular culture, his experimental technique, his political satire, and his broad-canvased depictions of British society. Though his first three books, An Accidental Woman, A Touch of Love, and The Dwarves of Death, received little notice upon publication, Moseley shows their strengths as literary works and as precursors. In 1994 Coe gained visibility with What a Carve Up!, which has remained his most admired and discussed novel. He has since published a postmodern take on sleep disorders and university students, The House of Sleep; a two-volume roman-fleuve consisting of The Rotters' Club and The Closed Circle; a touching account of a lonely woman's life, The Rain before It Falls; a satiric vision of a misguided life, The Terrible Privacy of Maxwell Sim; and a domestic comedy thriller set at the 1958 World's Fair in Brussels, Expo '58. Moseley explicates these works and discusses the recurring features of Coe's fiction: political consciousness, a deep artistic concern with the form of fiction, and comedy.

https://twitter.com/jonathancoe
http://www.sc.edu/uscpress/books/2016/7650.html
http://www.sc.edu/uscpress/books/2016/7650.pdf